Categories

There are twelve categories which you can enter for 2017 UK Roofing Awards​, as shown below:

  • Environmental - Shingles & Shakes | Blue Roofs | Solar | Thatch 
  • Green Roofs
  • Lead Roofing
  • Hard Metal - Zinc | Copper
  • Sheeting & Cladding
  • Heritage Roofing - Slating | Tiling
  • Roof Tiling
  • Roof Slating
  • Mastic Asphalt /Hot Melt
  • Liquid Applied Roofing and Waterproofing
  • Reinforced Bitumen Membranes
  • Single Ply

Photography

Clear, good quality photography is an absolute must for any UK Roofing Award entry. The images that you select are used by the judges to get a better understanding of the project (such as scale and workmanship). They are also used as a means to back up the written aspect of the entry, so if you talk about the vast scale of the project then consider including an aerial shot.

Below are a number of other good and bad examples of photography:

1. Take photographs throughout the project, not just on completion. By taking photographs throughout the entirety of a project you stand a better chance that you have a good range of photographs to select from. A good set of photographs includes one or two long shots of the finished roof, a few works in progress and a few mid​-range ones of finished or partly finished details.

2. Clear Shots - Steer clear of any images where the project is obscured by trees, buildings etc.

Cathedral obscured by trees

Cathedral is too obscured by trees.

Photograph example finished roof

Good clear aerial shot of the roof gives a better understanding of the size of the project, location and aesthetics.

3. Include images that show work in progress. These help the judges get a better understanding of how the roof/ certain elements were constructed.

Detail Shot

A close up detail of work in progress.

4. Visible PPE - Your images will likely show people working on site, it is absolutely essential that the correct PPE is shown i.e. hard hats, high-visibility clothing etc.

Good Example 9

Visible PPE as well as a clear shot of detailing in progress.

5. Close up shots of finished detailing. Judges like to be able to zoom in to check for neatness of workmanship and to see any difficult or unusual details.

6. ​Camera Phones - Since they were first introduced back in 2000, camera phones have come along way, and in some instances have been known out perform even the best digital camera. One of the best things about camera phones is the fact that nearly everyone has one, so why not encourage site operatives to take (safely) photographs of their work throughout the project.

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